Diabetes Information

Improper pH Balance Increases Risk and Damage of Diabetes


THE RISK

Blood sugar balance is critical to your body's proper functioning. Blood sugar (glucose) is the primary source of fuel for the body's cells and is particularly critical to the brain and the eyes. When glucose isn't regulated properly through the bloodstream, the body's cells don't obtain the energy they need. Excessively high blood sugar (hyperglycemia, or diabetes) or excessively low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) prevents organs from working properly and leads to a decline in health.

The body's blood sugar level is regulated primarily by the pancreas and the liver. The liver stores excess glucose and releases it when needed. The pancreas secretes insulin that helps carry glucose into the body's cells, and it secretes glucagon that triggers the release of stored glucose in the liver. When either organ fails to function properly, blood sugar becomes excessively high or low and the cells begin to "starve."

A highly acidic pH level puts the pancreas, liver, and all the body's organs at risk. Because of the important role played by the liver in removing acid waste from the body, liver function is particularly at risk when acids accumulate. When acidity prevents the liver and pancreas from regulating blood sugar, the risk of diabetes increases.

THE DAMAGE

Not only does high acidity make you vulnerable to diabetes. The impact of diabetes on the body increases the level of acid waste. Therefore improper pH balance puts diabetics at greater risk for complications such as kidney failure, gangrene and blindness.

A diabetic suffers from an excess of glucose in the bloodstream - glucose that cannot be delivered properly to the body's cells due to lack of insulin. As the liver absorbs more and more of the excess glucose, its ability to remove toxins from the body becomes impaired. As the toxins multiply, the acid level in the body increases.

Because glucose is not delivered properly to the body's cells, the cells start to malfunction. They expel increasing amounts of acid waste. Some of the excess acid filters through the kidneys, causing damage that can lead to kidney failure. Some of the acid accumulates in the liver, further damaging the liver's ability to remove toxins.

Acid that is not filtered out or stored can attach to and harden the cell walls, further preventing the cells from absorbing nutrients. Eventually the cells die, starting with the glucose-dependent eyes and the extremities where it's more difficult for nutrients to reach. Blindness and gangrene can result.

THE BENEFITS OF A BALANCED pH

Fortunately, a significant reduction of acids in your body can lead to organ regeneration and improved health. A diet that's more alkaline can help you reverse the damage caused by acidity and diabetes.

The right combination of fresh vegetable juices, for example, can help your body break down and destroy excessive acid waste. For a doubly positive impact, eliminate sugars and refined carbohydrates from your diet. Not only do sugars and refined carbohydrates make it difficult to control your blood sugar balance, but they also increase your body's acidity. Vitamin and mineral supplements specially formulated to balance pH are an important part of your strategy as well.

If you start to balance your pH level through supplements and easy-to-learn diet and lifestyle changes, you will reduce your vulnerability to diabetes and its complications. You can look forward to a healthier life.

If you truly want to change and help your body heal itself you need to take a proactive approach. Don't expect to feed your body processed foods, not exercise, then pop a pill and be all better? it just doesn't work that way. If you want to bring your body into pH balance then you need a complete approach. A great place to start is the Immersion Kit, you can learn more by going to http://www.pH-health.com


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