Diabetes Information

Raising Happy Diabetic Kids


This is the first in a series of articles I am about to embark upon concerning this subject. As my family gets older and matures with this disease I think back to the early days and wonder why aren't we all on medication for depression? Why don't we have standing twice a week appointments with a psychiatrist? How did we end up so normal?(whatever that is) As I look back this didn't happen by accident, nor am I Super Dad, and I didn't plan it out step by step. It was mostly just paying attention, luck, and decent communication between my girls and me, granted sometimes at the top of our lungs.

The first thing I suggest you do is very important. Remember, our children are who they had in mind when they coined the phrase "monkey see monkey do". Trust Yourself! It's okay to do it your way. There're three components to raising happy kids, diabetic or not. They are Self-Confidence, Self-Reliance, an Self-Control. The more of these components your monkeys see in you, the more of these components you will see in your monkeys! I'm going to put out some ideas here but you're the boss of your situation. Do it your way.

Upon reading the three components you might ask "but where is self esteem?" I'll save that particular ramble for another day. Let me just assure you that if your child has self-confidence, self-reliance, and self-control then self-esteem comes naturally.

What is Self-Confidence?Self-Confidence is:

Trusting your ability to form and sustain relationships

Trusting your ability to complete various tasks well, knowing that others value your abilities

Trusting your ability to manage new siuations

Trusting your own judgements and common sense

As you can see trust is a key element of self-confidence. When our children don't have that measure of consistency and predictability in their lives it becomes difficult for them to gain the necessary trust either in themselves or in others to become self-confident. So if our children see that the people who are most important to them (us as parents) trust them and will provide them with a consistant environment, they will begin to trust themselves, their judgements, and those of the people around them. This is the beginning of common sense.(Yahoo!)

How do our children acquire Self-Confidence?Self-Confidence comes from:

Being accepted for who you are

Having someone show confidence in you

Knowing there is something you are good at

Having firm expectations of other people's behavior

Not being afraid of failure

Developing competence with the saftey of a parent close by

Seeing others you admire and copy, being confident and happy

It seems so easy when you write it down. When you think about it three main components have to be in place: Trust and Predictability, competence, and sociability.

Trust and Predictability - We all know that routines are important for developing feelings of trust and security. Think about the routines and relationships between you and your family and friends. How much do they keep to a pattern? Will your child begin each day with a reasonably clear idea of what will happen and when?

Competence - Being good at things. We all have different talents and abilities. We need to help our children identify the things they are good at and encourage them. These skills fall into a couple of different catagories.

Practical: Seeing how to make or mend things, and build things

Physical: Good at sports, kicking or catching a ball, swimming, running

Mental: Good ideas about things, good at solving practical problems, good at schoolwork

Social: Good at playing with others, kind and considerate, good at making new friends

Process: Being good at tying new things, sticking with difficult tasks and so on

Sociability - Trust and develope their social skills. Involve them moderately in your social life. If we have our children with us it shows not only are we happy to have them with us but also that we trust they will behave appropriately. Getting used to being in new situations, and learning to talk to different people will increase our children's confidence considerably. Here's one that took me a while to figure out. Give your child advance warning of your feelings, of short temper, tiredness, sadness, or whatever. "I've had a lousy day at work and I'm very crabby. It might be smart to keep your head down and your mouth shut." Or "I've had an argument with so and so and I'm feeling hurt. If I'm short with you I'm sorry." This not only teaches them techniques for managing their own feelings, but gives them a chance to learn sensitivity to the feelings and moods of others. These are essential social skills not only for now but for later on in life.

Our children will develope self-confidence only if we have first shown trust and confidence in them and have given them an environment where they can predict and trust. Diabetes and all of the unpredictability, feelings of powerlessness, and exclusion that sometimes go with it just make this process that much more difficult. I look at it like if it was easy any idiot could do it. Well, we're not just any idiot. We're special idiots. We have been entrusted with the care and upbringing of a diabetic child. So remember you are a special person entrusted with a very special task. Trust yourself. It's okay to do it your way.

In the next issue I'll take a look at Self-Reliance.

Russell Turner is the father of a 10 year old Type 1 Juvenile Diabetic daughter. When she was first diagnosed he quickly found there was all kinds of information on the internet about the medical aspects of this dsease. What he couldn't find was information about how to prepare his family to live with this disease. He started a website http://www.mychildhasdiabetes.comand designed it so parents of newly diagnosed children would have a one-stop resource to learn to prepare for life with diabetes.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


New York Times

Working Nights May Raise Diabetes Risk - The New York Times
New York Times
The more often people worked nights, the more likely they were to have Type 2 diabetes.
Rotating Night Shifts a Path to DiabetesWebMD

all 2 news articles »


Physical exercise reduces risk of developing diabetes, study shows
Science Daily
And they have observed health benefits from low-intensity physical activity too -- making it possible for older people to take steps to improve their health and reduce the risk of diabetes. The research team, led by experts from the University of ...



Medical News Today

Type 1 diabetes: Does the gut hold the key to prevention?
Medical News Today
Researchers from the University of Queensland in Australia have found distinct gut microbiota alterations in rodents and humans that are at high risk of type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, the scientists found that these gut microbiota alterations were a ...



Lexington Herald Leader

Why dozens of lawsuits against diabetes drug are coming to Lexington
Lexington Herald Leader
Dozens of lawsuits filed across the country against a diabetes drug have been transferred to U.S. District Court in Lexington. More than 80 product-liability suits — 14 from New Jersey alone — have been transferred to U.S. District Judge Karen ...



Newsday

Type 1 diabetes won't keep me from the activities I enjoy
Newsday
Living with Type 1 diabetes has changed my life drastically. I had to learn to read nutrition labels, count carbs and give up many snacks that I enjoy eating. Some days this disease can really be a drag. On average I have to prick my finger 10 times a ...
Women with Type 1 diabetes come across unique challengesNews-Medical.net
Type 1 diabetes and high schoolMichigan State University Extension
Eye on healthcare: Diabetes, what is to be done?Runnels County Register

all 8 news articles »


The Outline

If your Apple Watch knows you'll get diabetes, who can it tell? | The ...
The Outline
Silicon Valley is starting to publish research using Apple Watch data, but there are still no laws about what information they keep, sell, or share.

and more »


Hometown Hero: Noah's March for Diabetes
WTOC
If there is such a thing as a good reason for walking 4,000 miles, Noah Barnes had one. "I really, really, really want a cure. That's what I want most," Barnes said. The 10-year-old went the distance in an effort to help find one, walking across the ...



Clinical Advisor

HbA1C levels linked to cognitive decline in diabetes
Clinical Advisor
HbA1C levels are associated with long-term cognitive decline regardless of patient diabetes status, according to an article published in Diabetologia. Fanfan Zheng, PhD, from the Brainnetome Center of the Institute of Automation at the Chinese Academy ...



MobiHealthNews

Roche's Accu-Chek diabetes management app receives its fifth FDA recall
MobiHealthNews
Roche's Accu-Chek Connect Diabetes Management App has hit yet another snag with the FDA. On February 15, the agency issued a Class 2 Device Recall for certain software versions of the app due to a bug that could lead users to self-administer ...



MyAJC

Some choice words for diabetes
MyAJC
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO/NYT A screenshot provided by the University of California, San Francisco, of Tassiana Willis taking part in a program that uses art to confront obesity and diabetes. The Bigger Picture campaign uses spoken-word ...

and more »

Google News

home | site map
© 2009